“What is the origin of the Easter bunny and Easter eggs?”


It is thought that the word Easter comes from a pagan figure called Eastre (or Eostre) who was celebrated as the goddess of spring by the Saxons of Northern Europe. A festival called Eastre was held during the spring equinox by these people to honor her. Of interest is the word’s relation toeast(ostin German). The name for a celebration of the sunrise and a change of season was eventually applied to the Christian celebration of the resurrection of Christ and the new era He heralded.

The goddess Eastre’s earthly symbol was the rabbit, which was also known as a symbol of fertility. Since rabbits and hares give birth to large litters in the early spring, it’s understandable that the rabbit is the symbol of fertility.

The legend of the Easter Bunny bringing eggs appears to have been brought to the United States by settlers from southwestern Germany. The German tradition of the Easter Bunny or “Oschter Haws” migrated to America in the 1800s, likely accompanying German immigrants, many of whom settled in Pennsylvania. Over the past 200 years, the Easter Bunny has become the most commercially recognized symbol of Easter.

In legend, the Easter Bunny, also called the Easter Hare and the Spring Bunny, brings baskets filled with colored eggs, candy, and sometimes toys to the homes of children on the night before Easter, in much the same way as Santa Claus is said to deliver presents on Christmas Eve. The Easter Bunny will either put the baskets in a designated place or hide them somewhere in the house or garden for the children to find when they wake up in the morning, giving rise to the tradition of the Easter egg hunt.

Should Christian parents allow their children to participate in traditional activities that refer to the Easter Bunny? This is a question both parents and church leaders struggle with. There is nothing essentially evil about the Easter Bunny, unless it is used to promote the goddess of spring or fertility rites. What is important is our focus. If our focus is on Christ and not the Easter Bunny, our children will understand that, like Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny is merely a symbol. As with Christmas, Easter should be a time to reflect upon and celebrate the incarnation, the resurrection and the risen Christ.

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“Did God create Satan?”



God has created everything that ever has been, is, or will be (John 1:3). This includes physical beings and matter as well as spiritual beings (Colossians 1:15-17). The only person who has the power of being in and of Himself—meaning He has no beginning or ending—and is self-existent is God (Exodus 3:14). All other beings were therefore created by God and belong to God (Psalm 24:1).

There are prophetic, biblical references to the King of Babylon and the King of Tyre. These personages are considered by most scholars as types of Satan (Isaiah 14:12-15; Ezekiel 28:13-17). These two passages give the reader a bit of history concerning Satan and his origins. Verse 12 of Isaiah 14 says Satan’s beginnings were in heaven. The Ezekiel 28 passage says Satan was created (verse 13) as one of the cherubim (verse 14) and was blameless until sin was found in him (verse 15).

The Bible describes the root of Satan’s sin as pride (Ezekiel 28:17). Before Satan was expelled from heaven, he must have been very beautiful both inside and out (Ezekiel 28:12). Ezekiel 28:15 is careful to say that Satan was created “blameless,” and his sin was of his own doing (Ezekiel 28:16-18). So it would be incorrect to believe that God created Satan with sin already present in himself. God is holy and does not create anything that is contrary to His own nature (Psalm 86:8-10 ,Isaiah 40:25;57:15).

So, while it is correct to say God created Satan, it’s never correct to say that God created the sin within Satan. Satan chose his own course (Isaiah 14:13). God never causes sin (James 1:13), even though He has created a world where sin is possible. Some day God is going to put an end to Satan and all sin (Revelation 20:10) by confining him and his minions to everlasting punishment.

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“What is the role of ushers in the church?”



A church usher is a person who helps ensure a smoothly running church service and who ministers to people in a variety of practical ways. The specific responsibilities of an usher vary with the church, but his duties usually include greeting people as they arrive for the service, assisting people with special needs, and collecting the offering. Some churches provide a pin or name tag of some kind to easily identify their ushers.

Before the church service starts, the ushers will often have the responsibility to check the thermostat, check the restrooms, make sure the hymnals are placed correctly, and prepare the bulletins for distribution. As the churchgoers arrive, the ushers will act as doorkeepers, greeting each person with a smile, shaking hands, and handing out bulletins. They are also available to answer visitors’ questions and extend extra help in seating those who need the assistance. Often, the ushers will escort people to the proper nursery or Sunday school classroom, especially if the church building is a large one.

During the church service, the ushers usually take part in some way. They are responsible to take up the church offering and make sure it is put in the proper place. In some churches, ushers also help with the Lord’s Table. Ushers have a goal of minimizing distractions during the music and sermon. Ushers stand ready to assist anyone in the congregation who might need help, to aid latecomers in finding a seat, and to inform those in the sanctuary of any urgent matters. Some churches appoint an usher or two to monitor the facility, including the parking lot, to prevent vandalism, theft, or other wrongdoing.

Church ushers are well versed in emergency procedures. In case of an emergency, the ushers will take the lead in getting people to safety in an orderly manner.

After the service, ushers will again be at the door to greet the congregation as they leave and provide assistance as needed. In many churches, the ushers will then make sure that the sanctuary is tidy, the thermostat is adjusted, and the lights are shut off.

Although the position of “usher” is not mentioned in the Bible, ushers today provide an invaluable service to the local church body. In many ways, the ushers are the “face” of the church, the first ones that people see when they arrive and the last ones they see as they leave. It is important that an usher be friendly, honest, and willing to serve. It is an honorable position in the church, requiring integrity, cordiality, and wisdom.

The heart of an usher is the heart of a servant, and he does his work for his Lord Jesus (Colossians 3:24 ). A church usher has a true love for the people of the church and a desire to promote an atmosphere of reverence and worship in the house of God. An usher’s theme verse could very well be Psalm 84:10, “I would rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God than dwell in the tents of the wicked.”

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“What is the Queen James Bible?”



The Queen James Bible (QJV), also called the “Gay Bible,” is an edit of the biblical text done in the name of preventing “homophobic interpretations.” To accomplish this goal, the publishers printed a Bible in which all negative references to homosexuality have been removed. The Queen James Bible was published in 2012 and is based on the 1769 edition of the King James Bible.

The publishers of the Queen James Bible chose the name “Queen James” as an obvious take-off on the “King James” Version, as the Authorized Version of 1611 is commonly called. The publishers of the Gay Bible also claim that King James was bisexual, so their choice of title capitalizes on the slang meaning of the termqueen.

The editors of the Queen James Bible, who chose to be anonymous, claim that there was no reference to homosexuality in any Bible translation prior to the 1946 Revised Standard Version. Then, they assert, “anti-LGBT Bible interpretations” arose, based on a faulty translation in the RSV of eight verses.

The unidentified “scholars”—their scholastic credentials are unknown—who produced the Queen James Bible suggest that all Bible translations of these eight verses are wrong and that they are the only ones who have got it right. Below are the eight verses. The King James Version is shown first, followed by the Queen James Version and some comments concerning each change:

Genesis 19:5:“And they called unto Lot, and said unto him, ‘Where are the men which came in to thee this night? Bring them out unto us, that we may know them’” (KJV). (The expression “to know” (in this context) means to have sexual intercourse.)

“And they called out unto Lot, and said unto him, ‘Where are the men which came in to thee this night? Bring them out unto us, that we may rape and humiliate them’” (QJV, emphasis added).

The change from “know them” to “rape and humiliate them” is based on the idea that male-on-male rape is not really a sexual act but is an expression of power and domination. It is clear that physical rape was what the men of Sodom had in mind, but nowhere in the Hebrew text is the word humiliate used.

Leviticus 18:22:“Thou shalt not lie with mankind, as with womankind: it is abomination” (KJV).Leviticus 20:13:“If a man also lie with mankind, as he lieth with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination; they shall surely be put to death; their blood shall be upon them” (KJV).

The editors of the Queen James Version reckon that Leviticus is outdated as a moral code. They say the Hebrew word translated “abomination” is something that was “ritually unclean” or a “taboo.” From this they assert that a biblical “abomination” would be understood by today’s standards to be something “scandalous.” Because they do not consider homosexual relations to be taboo (and because not all abominable offenses were punishable by death), the publishers of the QJV conclude that, at some point in time, there must have been an error in translation. Whereas Leviticus 20:13 clearly says that men lying together is an “abomination,” punishable by death, the editors of the Queen James Bible claim that, if having sex with a man was punishable by death, it wouldn’t be called an abomination. However, it is clear that to lie with a person does not mean simply to be prone and go to sleep. The biblical expression “to lie with” means to have sexual relations (see Genesis 39:12).

The editors of the Queen James Version want us to believe that Leviticus 18:12 and 20:13 are all about pagan worship of the god Molech. They have therefore taken the liberty of adding to the Word of God. This is how they have rendered these two passages:

“Thou shalt not lie with mankind as with womankind in the temple of Molech; it is an abomination” (QJV, emphasis added).

“If a man also lie with mankind in the temple of Molech, as he lieth with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination: they shall surely be put to death; their blood shall be upon them” (QJV, emphasis added).

So, according to the editors of the QJV, it is “abominable” for a man have sex with a man if they’re in the temple of Molech, but it’s not “abominable” for a man to have sex with a man if it has nothing to do with Molech worship.

Romans 1:26–27:“For this cause God gave them up unto vile affections: for even their women did change the natural use into that which is against nature: And likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust one toward another; men with men working that which is unseemly, and receiving in themselves that recompense of their error which was meet” (KJV).

The plain reading of this passage indicates that lesbianism and homosexuality are unnatural. The Greek words for “against nature” mean “monstrous, abnormal and perverse; that which is contrary to nature’s laws.”

But the editors of the Queen James Bible assert that verse 26 is not talking about women engaging in lesbian sex. Neither do they accept that lesbianism is “unnatural.” While acknowledging that they really have no idea what is meant by women engaging in the “unnatural” use of their bodies, they suggest it could mean pagan dancing. As for the men, we are to believe the “unseemly” behavior is sexual activity linked to idolatry. The Queen James Bible reads thus:

“Their women did change their natural use into that which is against nature: And likewise also the men, left of the natural use of the woman, burned inrituallust, one toward another; Men with men working that which ispagan andunseemly. For this cause God gavethe idolatorsup unto vile affections, receiving in themselves that recompense of their error which was meet” (QJV, emphasis added). Note how they have again added to the Word of God to conform it to their thinking.

The editors of the Queen James Bible claim that most scholars believe the sin in Romans 1 isn’t being gay or lesbian or having gay sex. The sin, they say, is pagan worship. Interestingly, there is no evidence to back up their claim that “most scholars” agree with them.

1 Corinthians 6:9:“Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived; neither fornicators, nor idolators, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with mankind” (KJV).

The Greek word for “soft” is translated as “effeminate”; that is, a “soft, womanly man.” But the Queen James Bible editors claim that the word effeminate is unrelated to how the word is used today; rather, it means “morally weak.” The Greek word arsenokoites translated here as “abusers of themselves with mankind,” refers to sodomites, males engaging in same-gender sexual activity. However, the QJV editors claim this means “the male who has many beds,” an expression referring to men who are promiscuous. They say that, since no specific Greek word forhomosexualitywas used, they are justified in “translating” it as “promiscuous.” The phrase “abusers of themselves with mankind” has simply been replaced in the QJV:

“Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolators, nor adulterers, normorally weak, norpromiscuous” (QJV, emphasis added).

1 Timothy 1:10:“For whoremongers, for them that defile themselves with mankind, for menstealers, for liars, for perjured persons, and if there be any other thing that is contrary to sound doctrine” (KJV).

The editors of the Queen James Bible objected to the expression “defile themselves with mankind,” so they simply deleted “with mankind”:

“For whoremongers, for them thatdefile themselves, for menstealers, for liars, for perjured persons, and if there be any other thing that is contrary to sound doctrine” (QJV, emphasis added).

Jude 1:7:“Even as Sodom and Gomorrha, and the cities about them in like manner, giving themselves over to fornication, and going after strange flesh, are set forth for an example, suffering the vengeance of eternal fire” (KJV). “Strange flesh” here refers to illicit use of the human body.

The editors of the Queen James Bible felt that this recount of the story of Sodom needed clarification. So, the “strange flesh” the mob of Sodom was seeking was “angelic flesh”; that is, it was only “strange” because it was nonhuman. Thus, the sexual violence the men of Sodom wanted to perform on Lot’s guests cannot be truly called a homosexual act:

“Even as Sodom and Gomorrha, and the cities about them in like manner, giving themselves over to fornication, and going after nonhuman flesh, are set forth for an example, suffering the vengeance of eternal fire” (QJV, emphasis added). However, the men of Sodom didn’t know Lot’s guests were angels! For all they knew, the guests were men, just like they. The implication is that Jude is denouncing men having sex with men, not men lusting after angels.

Jesus warned against altering one jot or tittle from God’s Word (Matthew 5:18). Yet the unidentified editors of the Queen James Bible have seen fit to boldly remove anything they dislike and add words that have no right to be there—all to try to make God say what they want said. They are trying to hammer a square peg into a round hole, linguistically speaking, and it will never work. What are their scholastic credentials? Where can seekers of truth go to verify their claims? Are we to believe that all other Bible translators succumbed to “interpretive ambiguity,” while only the editors of the QJV have seen the truth of the text?

There is no textual support for the changes they have made to these eight Scriptures. The only reason for making such changes is to accomplish their stated goal of making “homophobic interpretations impossible.” In other words, they are twisting the Word of God to suit their agenda.

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“How, why, and when did Satan fall from heaven?”


Satan’s fall from heaven is symbolically described in Isaiah 14:12-14 and Ezekiel 28:12-18. While these two passages are referring specifically to the kings of Babylon and Tyre, they also reference the spiritual power behind those kings, namely, Satan. These passages describe why Satan fell, but they do not specifically say when the fall occurred. What we do know is this: the angels were created before the earth (Job 38:4-7). Satan fell before he tempted Adam and Eve in the Garden (Genesis 3:1-14). Satan’s fall, therefore, must have occurred somewhere after the time the angels were created and before he tempted Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. Whether Satan’s fall occurred a few minutes, hours, or days before he tempted Adam and Eve in the Garden, Scripture does not specifically say.

The book of Job tells us that, for a time at least, Satan still had access to heaven and to the throne of God. “One day the angels came to present themselves before the LORD, and Satan also came with them. The LORD said to Satan, ’Where have you come from?’ Satan answered the LORD, ‘From roaming through the earth and going back and forth in it’” (Job 1:6-7). Apparently at that time, Satan was still moving freely between heaven and earth, speaking to God directly and answering for his activities. At what point God discontinued this access is unknown.

Why did Satan fall from heaven? Satan fell because of pride. He desired to be God, not to be a servant of God. Notice the many “I will…” statements in Isaiah 14:12-15. Ezekiel 28:12-15 describes Satan as an exceedingly beautiful angel. Satan was likely the highest of all angels, the most beautiful of all of God’s creations, but he was not content in his position. Instead, Satan desired to be God, to essentially “kick God off His throne” and take over the rule of the universe. Satan wanted to be God, and interestingly enough, that is what Satan tempted Adam and Eve with in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 3:1-5). How did Satan fall from heaven? Actually, a fall is not an accurate description. It would be far more accurate to say God cast Satan out of heaven (Isaiah 14:15;Ezekiel 28:16-17). Satan did not fall from heaven; rather, Satan was pushed out of heaven.

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How old will we be in heaven?


THE WALL: a blog of Baptist Voice Ministries

I believe that we will be 33 years old in heaven forever.  This is based upon my interpretation of Scripture.

The Bible says, “And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the lastAdam was made a quickening spirit.” ( I Cor. 15:45)  Who is the last Adam?  “The firstman is of the earth, earthly: the second man is the Lord from heaven.”  (1 Cor. 15:47)  We now look like the first man (Adam), but we will have a glorified body like that of Jesus after He was raised from the dead.  “And as we have borne the image of the earthy, we shall also bear the image of the heavenly.”  (1 Cor. 15:49)

Jesus was 33 years old when He was raised from the dead and received His glorified body.  The Bible says, “Who shall…

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“Is there extra-biblical evidence of the ten plagues in Egypt?”


Some critics of the Bible claim that there is no verifiable evidence to support the Bible’s account of the Exodus of the Hebrews from Egypt. They say that Egyptologists have found no record of the Hebrew people in Egypt or the ten plagues as described in the book of Exodus. Christians accept that the Bible is God’s inspired Word, and they do not doubt that these events happened. They do not require extra-biblical accounts. However, external evidence can be useful in silencing detractors who say the ten plagues and the Exodus are just myths.

The Ipuwer Papyrus is an ancient document that provides a possible independent record of the ten plagues in Egypt. It describes a great disaster that took place in ancient Egypt. The oldest copy dates to around 1400 BC, placing it close to the time of the Exodus (circa 1446 BC). The Ipuwer Papyrus is the sole surviving manuscript of an ancient Egyptian poem officially designated as Papyrus Leiden I-344. The poem is known as “The Admonitions of Ipuwer.” A new edition is available now entitled “The Dialogue of Ipuwer and the Lord of All.” Dutchman Giovanni Anastasi purchased the Ipuwer Papyrus in 1828, and it is now housed in Leiden, the Netherlands, at the Dutch National Museum of Antiquities, the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden.

We shall now compare the Bible’s account of the plagues with the relevant parts of the Ipuwer Papyrus.

The first plague (turning the Nile to blood).The Nile River, which formed the basis of daily life and the national economy in Egypt, was devastated as millions of fish died and the water was unusable. Pharaoh was told by God, “By this you will know that I am the LORD” (Exodus 7:17). The Ipuwer Papyrus says, “Plague is throughout the land. Blood is everywhere” (2:5–6). “The river is blood. . . . Men shrink from tasting—human beings, and thirst after water” (2:10). “That is our water! That is our happiness! What shall we do in respect thereof? All is ruin” (3:10–13).

The fifth plague (the death of livestock).God protected His people from this plague, while the cattle of the Egyptians died. God was steadily destroying the economy of Egypt, while showing His ability to protect and provide for those who obeyed Him. Pharaoh even sent investigators (Exodus 9:18-35) to find out if the Israelites were suffering along with the Egyptians, but the result was a hardening of his heart against them. The Ipuwer Papyrus says, “All animals, their hearts weep. Cattle moan” (5:5). “Behold, cattle are left to stray, and there is none to gather them together (9:2–3).

The seventh plague (hail and fire).This hail was unlike any that had been seen before. It was accompanied by a fire which ran along the ground, and everything left out in the open was devastated by the hail and fire. Again, the children of Israel were miraculously protected, and no hail damaged anything in their lands (Exodus 9:35). The Ipuwer Papyrus says, “Forsooth, gates, columns and walls are consumed by fire” (2:10). “Lower Egypt weeps. . . . The entire palace is without its revenues. To it belong [by right] wheat and barley, geese and fish” (10:3–6). “Forsooth, grain has perished on every side” (6:3). “Forsooth, that has perished which was yesterday seen. The land is left over to its weariness like the cutting of flax” (5:12).

The ninth plague (darkness).For three days, the land of Egypt was smothered with an unearthly darkness, but the homes of the Israelites had light (Exodus 10:22-23). The Ipuwer Papyrus says, “The land is without light” (9:11).

The tenth and last plague (the death of firstborn males).Every household that did not apply the blood of the Passover sacrifice saw the death of the firstborn (Exodus 12:23). The Ipuwer Papyrus says, “Forsooth, the children of princes are dashed against the walls” (4:3 and 5:6). “Forsooth, the children of princes are cast out in the streets” (6:12). “He who places his brother in the ground is everywhere” (2:13). “It is groaning throughout the land, mingled with lamentations” (3:14).

The Ipuwer Papyrus also contains a possible reference to the Hebrews’ departure from Egypt, laden with treasures: “Gold and lapis lazuli, silver and malachite, carnelian and bronze . . . are fastened on the neck of female slaves” (3:2; cf.Exodus 12:35-38). Further, there is a possible description of the pillar of fire: “Behold, the fire has mounted up on high. Its burning goes forth against the enemies of the land” (7:1; cf.Exodus 13:20-22).

Egyptologist David Rohl, who doesn’t claim to be a Christian, has written two books on how biblical accounts relating to Egypt, Joseph, and Moses are astonishingly accurate. He believes Joseph and Moses were historic characters and cites Bronze Age slave lists containing Hebrew names, the grave goods of an underclass discovered at Avaris (the biblical Goshen), and Egyptian “plague pits” full of skeletal remains.

While the Bible does not need confirmation from secular historians, and Christians do not require extra-biblical accounts in order to believe the Bible, it is interesting that independent records of biblical events exist—records with remarkable parallels to the biblical accounts.

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